Induction furnace ??

Discussion in 'General foundry chat' started by DavidF, Apr 16, 2019.

  1. DavidF

    DavidF Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

  2. PatJ

    PatJ Silver Banner Member

    As it states, made for casting rings, and capacity is 5 oz, which isn't much but ok for rings.

    Why not just make a spinning arm with crucible, and melt the metal with an oxy-acetylene torch like most people seem to do?

    That is a big piece of equipment for 5 oz castings.

    Just my 2 cents.
    .
     
  3. oldironfarmer

    oldironfarmer Silver Banner Member

    Pretty impressive temperature range.
     
  4. They were used by dental labs to make gold crowns for dentists, there should be a few unit in every large city. Most of the work is outsourced overseas these days.

    Edit: if you look at the photo with the crucible, you can see the induction coil that drops down at the press of a button to allow the centrifuge to spin the metal into the investment.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2019
    DavidF likes this.
  5. DavidF

    DavidF Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

    Where did you come up with the 5 oz. Castings from?? Its 150 cc crucible capacity. That's damn near 3 lbs ss.
    Trying to get more information, looks like a pretty old machine. Parts could be difficult to aquire...
     
  6. Al2O3

    Al2O3 Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

    Also a vacuum induction system in his other auctions if you can get through all the lizard and snake skins. Both made in Italy so if not domestically supported factor that into parts availability too.

    Best,
    Kelly
     
  7. DavidF

    DavidF Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

    It's really tempting... fair price and not too far away so i could pick it up... Pretty certain it would pay for itself pretty quickly too.
     
  8. Jason

    Jason Silver Banner Member

    You need that like another butthole.... It's cool, but walkaway.
     
  9. DavidF

    DavidF Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

    You might be right...But being able to make stainless emblems would be a big hit. Maybe I should just order that sla 3d printer ive been wanting for the past year?
     
  10. Melterskelter

    Melterskelter Silver Banner Member

    I must have overlooked it....what is required power supply----220, 440, 3 PHASE????

    Larger units that I have dreamed about take industrial strength power supplies.

    Denis
     
  11. Jason

    Jason Silver Banner Member

    Yeah, stainless would be bad ass I agree. Our jewelry shop sends stainless and platinum work out. Even though the guys are printing and casting their own stuff, when a problem child comes up, it's just too damn easy to email the file and pay the money. Let them deal with the nonsense, it's almost hard to compete with them.

    Good point Denis....
     
  12. DavidF

    DavidF Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

    thats what im waiting to hear back about....so far no response :(
     
  13. PatJ

    PatJ Silver Banner Member

    we used it to cast Inconel 702 stainless steel for rings

    Image1.jpg
     
  14. DavidF

    DavidF Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

    Ahh.. I C where your at....

    150 cc = 9.15 ci,
    stainless steel = .29 lbs ci
    9.15 x .29 = 2.65 lbs

    I know that 2.65 lbs doesnt seem like much when compared to a #20 crucible but.... "STAINLESS" ;):D:D
     
  15. DavidF

    DavidF Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

  16. Melterskelter

    Melterskelter Silver Banner Member

    Betcha one will show up for a lot less money if you start looking. 8 KW 220 3-phase is not the daunting. I have made a 5 kw rotary phase converter for shop use to supply 3-phase to a lathe. You just need a used 8 or 10 KW 3-phase electric motor and some capacitors. Big old motors like that are often available for not much money. (Typos corrected)

    Denis
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2019
  17. I often see auction flyers with equipment like this, especially the really large stuff. A lot of it is older vacuum tube equipment or early semiconductor equipment: the vacuum tube units are surprisingly rugged but the early semiconductor furnaces can be a bit of a gamble. Induction furnace design is a bit of a black art with different principles in play depending on whether you're melting ferrous or non-ferrous metals so the newer induction furnace designs are going to be better and more reliable.
    There's been a lot of improvements made in power semiconductors in recent times.
     
  18. PatJ

    PatJ Silver Banner Member

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