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Discussion in 'General foundry chat' started by Zapins, Jul 12, 2020.

  1. I can testify to the effectiveness of burning wood to help preserve it: I noticed some intact, untouched, burnt slices of toast in the backyard yesterday hurled while hot and smoking about a month ago :eek:.... it must rank up there with franchise cheeseburgers for long life :D.
     
  2. Zapins

    Zapins Silver Banner Member

    Or twinkies.

    Interesting. I had heard it helps preserve wood in contact with soil for 50 to 80 years but that seemed a bit optimistic. If I get 5 years I'll be happy. I also like the nice color of burned wood.

    I was using my dewalt miter saw which got stuck in the wood while cutting and I knocked the wood off the blade. Now the blade brake doesn't seem to work and it makes a funny sound. Ugh I'll have to open it up and investigate what broke and try find replacement parts.
     
  3. Seen something similar with a Hitachi circular saw that bogged down on aluminium plate. Some of those mitre saws have a left hand thread holding on the blade (blade is on the left side of the motor). I have a Ryobi that's been got at by someone who fitted a right hand screw, so if I use it the screw could unwind and release the blade.
     
  4. Zapins

    Zapins Silver Banner Member

    Blade still spins but the brake seems to have malfunctioned in some way and no longer slows the blade to a stop. Also it feels like the main blade lost some torque so I'm unsure what happened internally. I didn't have the time to investigate.

    I'll see what I can do to sort this out when I have some free time. Its definitely annoying since I still have more wood to cut.
     
  5. Some methods of motor braking are done electrically, if that's failed then it could be partially shorting the motor.
     
  6. Zapins

    Zapins Silver Banner Member

    I'm unsure where the brake is. I can't see an obvious break system so it must be in the motor.

    I took it apart and everything looks ok. When I spin it up without the blade inside it looks and acts normal and seems to brake appropriately. I'll out it back together and see if it work correctly now but I'm unsure what could be wrong. Any ideas? Is the motor bad?

    I did find a lot of mud wasp nests inside and some loose around the belt so maybe that messed up the brake system? I cleaned it out now though.

    **Edit**
    Seems like a lot of the forums on miter saws say that when the motor brushes wear out the electronic braking system seems to malfunction and simply replacing the brushes will fix the issue. So I ordered a pair of $7 brushes to see if it fixes the issue. Hope 2 will sort it out.


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    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021
  7. Peedee

    Peedee Silver

    A lot of the bigger saws use DC injection to stall the motor as Mark mentioned. I'd think you are on the right track with brushes unless the commutator is buggered.
     
  8. Zapins

    Zapins Silver Banner Member

    I'll check them later but I heard some scraping from the motor area so maybe the brushes are a bit buggered up and not contacting correctly. This all happened after the blade got stuck in wood and I whacked the wood out with my palm. Possibly the brushes are loose and not connected tightly so that vibration moved them out of position. Either way they probably need replacing as the saw has seen some use in the past. I'm the 3rd owner.

    I'll also take a peak at the geared portion and make sure nothing got stripped. And give it a clean inside. Those mud wasps infested the damn thing. Their nests are all over it.
     
  9. Peedee

    Peedee Silver

    The brushes are sprung, just make sure the new ones are super slidy fit and you should be good to go.
     
  10. Zapins

    Zapins Silver Banner Member

    Hmm I think I bought the wrong type. The brushes look different.

    They actually look pretty intact. Not sure if thats what the issue is.

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  11. Petee716

    Petee716 Gold Banner Member

    Brushes look to be in pretty good shape. I think the brake is activated when you release the trigger, so the trigger area might be another place to look (rectifier?).
     
  12. Zapins

    Zapins Silver Banner Member

    Hmm. True.

    I can't get the face plate off the gear box cover in the arm. It seems to be press fitted in some way.
     
  13. Jason

    Jason Gold

  14. Petee716

    Petee716 Gold Banner Member

    I found this
     
  15. Zapins

    Zapins Silver Banner Member

    Oh man I cut myself good. Damn bandsaw.
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  16. Jason

    Jason Gold

    OUCH?? were you using a push block?
     
  17. Peedee

    Peedee Silver

    My thoughts exactly, always have something you don't care about behind the piece if you are working up to the blade. That looks like it'll be painful for a few days
     
  18. Jason

    Jason Gold

    I sold that big bastard I had. The blade on that thing was an inch wide and gave me the creeps. It was way too fast and it could cut a friggen railroad tie it opened so wide. :eek:
     
  19. Yow!!!, bet you don't do that again, bandsaws frighten me, it's too easy to spin some tube while cutting or other misadventures like a blade weld breaking in operation.
     
  20. Petee716

    Petee716 Gold Banner Member

    Yuck. Coulda been way worse, but that's bad enough. When Im using either my vertical or horizontal bandsaw, workholding can get wonky when cutting oddball stuff. For me instability of the workpiece is almost always the cause of close calls and always the cause of blade damage. I clamp into one of these vises for straightness and stability when I can. I see MrPete do it frequently.
     

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