Glumpy burner, easy to run!

Discussion in 'Burners and their construction' started by Ironsides, Jun 1, 2019.

  1. Chazza

    Chazza Copper

    Have you got a link to your burner Ironsides?

    Cheers Charlie
     
  2. Ironsides

    Ironsides Silver

    I have not got a link for my oil burner but I made a video of my forced air propane burner.
     
  3. oldironfarmer

    oldironfarmer Silver Banner Member

    Drip burners are so incredibly simple. An air blower blowing the air through a tube 1-1/2" in diameter to 2" in diameter. Then a fuel supply with enough elevation to let the fuel flow through a tube to a pipe which is fixed to end at the center of the air tube. Mine is a piece of steel brake line. Then a valve to control how much fuel drips into the air stream. The air stream blows it into the hot furnace where it ignites. Lots of people, including me, pressurize their fuel tank with a few pis of air to give consistent fuel flow. That's it. If you like, and I do, add a connection into the side of the air pipe to let propane in when warming up the furnace.

    All very simple and nothing to go wrong.

    Look here: http://forums.thehomefoundry.org/index.php?threads/the-basics-drip-injection-waste-oil-burners.24/
     
  4. Chazza

    Chazza Copper

    Thanks Andy!
     
  5. OMM

    OMM Silver

    Andy, you mentioned you use brake line for the oil feed. Is this just open end? Or some type of tip down nozzle?

    My buddy who has a drip directly into the furnace has a bit of a shuttering affect with each drip. Is this the same with yours? Do you have a video with one of your melts?

    Maybe if you have your nozzle tipped down... into a fine stream, this might alleviate the shuttering of a drip.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  6. oldironfarmer

    oldironfarmer Silver Banner Member

    It's just open ended. The air stream carries it into the furnace. Everything burns in a 2,000F furnace. There is a lot of turbulence and bouncing around. I've read recently that is a good thing.

    My entire burner is tilted down about 10 degrees because I wanted the flame to start at the bottom, and the bottom is about the hottest part of my furnace.

    This is about the best I've got, it's not very good, you can't see the oil coming in, the tuyere is the dark spot on the far side at 4:30. Things were a little slow on this melt because I was messing with the thermocouple and not paying attention.



    My oil kind of drips and spurts and makes a deposit on the wall where it is pointed. The deposit of stuff that won't burn in the motor oil builds up to an inch or more thick before it breaks off. It gets white hot quickly and makes a very nice hot surface igniter. I'm a big believer in large combustion space in a furnace to give the gas time to transfer heat to the crucible instead of just spitting it right out the top.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2019
    Chazza likes this.
  7. Peedee

    Peedee Silver

    20,000F! I must build me one of these ;)
     
  8. oldironfarmer

    oldironfarmer Silver Banner Member

    :D:D

    But everything would burn. I started to correct it to 2,00F for fun.
     
  9. Chazza

    Chazza Copper

    Nice video Andy.

    What is your crucible made from?

    Cheers C
     

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