Osbourn Jolt/Squeeze Machine Available. Working. Good Condition

Discussion in 'Buy Sell Trade' started by Melterskelter, Apr 7, 2021.

  1. Melterskelter

    Melterskelter Gold Banner Member

    This is a nice-looking and fully functional Osbourn jolt/squeeze machine. I have not taken pics, but it sits in the barn in which I have my foundry. It belonged to the now-deceased owner of the barn and now is one of the many things his family needs to sell or dispose of. It is located a few miles from Bellingham Wa and probably weighs in the neighborhood of 700 pounds—-just a guess. It’s on a concrete slab in a dry building easily accessed through a large barn door without anything in its way.

    I do not do production work and don’t use flasks that would fit it almost ever. So, it makes no sense for me to buy it. But, for someone using flasks roughly 18” square or smaller it could really be a treat to use. It requires only an air compressor to operate it and it does not consume large volumes of air.

    The pricing is not firmly set. So, I can’t state a precise price. They are realistic about its niche market status.

    Denis
     
    Billy Elmore likes this.
  2. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    That sounds cool. Can you get some pictures?
    Patrick
     
  3. Melterskelter

    Melterskelter Gold Banner Member

    Sure, tomorrow.

    Denis


     
  4. Melterskelter

    Melterskelter Gold Banner Member

    Patrick-C, I screwed up and did not take my camera to the foundry this morning. Chances are I'll be heading out this afternoon. I will do my best to get some pics. Sorry, I screwed up this morning.

    Denis
     
  5. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    I am patient, I didn't mean to push you, just interested. So no hurry, and you don't have to make any special trips or anything.
    Patrick
     
  6. Melterskelter

    Melterskelter Gold Banner Member

    Patrick-C and anyone else interested.

    Here are a couple pics and a quick video.



    The table is 16x20.

    the paint looks like it may be original—-it is not freshly done.

    E8D21874-BE2B-4100-AC72-629CC03F8BD9.jpeg 1AF7EA99-51DD-491B-BCCE-1C3B1679C9B4.jpeg B55F5BD4-67C4-4F0A-84A6-F9A443C6401C.jpeg

    The squeeze cylinder is about 10” in diameter. So it would apply roughly 10,000 pounds pressure with its current 150 pound air supply.

    Denis
     
    OMM likes this.
  7. DavidF

    DavidF Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

    Sweet!!!
    Too far of a ride for me though
     
  8. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    Thank you for the video and pictures Denis. That is a really nice machine, and it is extremely powerful. I would love to have it in my shop:D.
    Does this mean it is more expensive, like way out of the reach of my budget? I do know I would probably need to have it shipped so that would cost a little more, but if you think the price is reasonable I might be interested.
    Patrick
     
  9. OMM

    OMM Silver Banner Member

    They are great machines. One of the foundries that I go to has three or four of them.... But, they are making 3 to 400 patterns a day or pouring 30,000 pounds of cast iron. Me personally, I'd rather have a pneumatic hand held rammer.
     
  10. Melterskelter

    Melterskelter Gold Banner Member

    No, Patrick, they recognize that this machine, if bought new today, would cost 10,000 dollars, but in today’s market has a narrow audience and hence, pricing has to reflect that. So, I advised them, that it would certainly be worth, in terms of time savings, 650 dollars to someone who would be using it in limited production runs and would quickly pay for itself. So, that is the price set.

    With respect to shipping, I am confident it could be transported in a typical medium to heavy duty pickup truck or on a trailer behind an SUV. I once picked up a 1500-pound Bridgeport in Montana and safely towed it home, 500+ miles, using a Pathfinder and felt very comfortable doing so. What made it easy was hiring a tow truck on each end (for 100 bucks) to lift it into the air while we backed under the load. On my end the driver carried it down my drive and poked it into the shop door. The key to safe towing was bolting 4x4’s to the base to widen its stance and correctly using heavy duty cargo straps to secure the load. We also blocked in the base to the deck. I never felt like we were doing anything sketchy.

    Denis
     

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