My Osborn Sand Molding Machine

Discussion in 'Foundry tools and flasks' started by Patrick-C, Jan 8, 2022.

  1. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    Okay guys! So here it is my first video on the Osborn squeeze jolt machine I got at the end of April 2021. I used it a ton throughout the summer and fall I must admit, but I was never able to make videos of it. Well here is the first one of many. A simple tour and overview that will be followed up with using it. And then giving it a work over. By the way what color scheme should I give it? The Metal Magic (red and gold) or the Metal Magic (red and blue)? I hope you guys like the video.
     
    Tobho Mott likes this.
  2. Al2O3

    Al2O3 Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

    You'll need flasks and match plates up to the task but they are venerable old machines, tried true and proven. Make sure you respect it's power Patrick. You don't ever want to shake hands with it.

    Best,
    Kelly
     
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  3. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    I am hoping to make some aluminum flasks soon, and I plan on making some match plates so I will make them tough. And trust me I will never shake hands, just a pat on the back every once and a while.

    Patrick
     
  4. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    Okay not entirely related but I made a mold with my machine and went to cast it in brass... and well there was some moisture in one of my ingot molds. And BOOM!:(:eek::oops: about a pound of molten brass everywhere some of it going up 16 feet to the ceiling of my foundry:oops:, and then raining back down. I got some holes in the front and back of my shirt and welding jacket. But of course that wasn't the worst of it, I was wearing a face shield but no skull cap:eek:. P1060341.jpeg
    That is a spot that will probably stay bald for a while. Sheesh going bald at 20.
    P1060343.jpeg
    And here is my new hero! Out the door with Captain America, and in with Jackson my face shield. New lens is on its way.

    Now don't worry the burn is not severe and it will not keep me from foundry work, just wet ingot molds.

    P1060332.jpeg
    On the "bright" side my cast came out. A nice Christmas decoration don't you think?

    Patrick
     
  5. That was a lucky escape...well not so lucky but saved by safety equipment. That eclipses my run in with a wet ingot mould: a splash the size of a five cent piece stopped by the facemask right over my eye that popped off immediately due to all the dust on the mask surface. In a lot of older foundry videos you see everyone wearing felt hats for good reason, I found a cotton baseball cap on backwards fits under the facemask: it'll burn but still stop some of the heat.
     
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  6. Al2O3

    Al2O3 Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

    Wow so glad you had a decent face shield.....that could have been much worse. Sometimes such incidents can serve as reminders as familiarity breeds contempt. Use good PPE and preheat ingot molds.

    Best,
    Kelly
     
    Patrick-C likes this.
  7. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    Me too. It was defiantly not a fun experience. And most of the time I cast all by myself, but this time I had an audience. It sure freaked them out, seeing me go up in flames after a big boom. Luckily I was the only one that got hurt. It was defiantly an interesting experience pulling brass out of my hair.
    Oh and by the way I won a casting contest on facebook with that casting above. So I will be getting another furnace.

    Patrick
     
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  8. rocco

    rocco Silver

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  9. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    LOL!:D:) I already put it in my Amazon cart a couple of hours ago. Are you tracking me?:p
    Thank you for the suggestion though.

    Partick
     
    rocco likes this.
  10. Melterskelter

    Melterskelter Gold Banner Member

    Patrick,

    If you had a blowout of sand due to moisture, your water content must have been very high. To try to get a handle on your content now that you’ve had that experience, have you tried baking out a few samples of mulled sand? Your per cent water should be in the neighborhood of 4%. Baking out moisture is not practical for me as an ongoing practice. But, since we are all pretty much work in isolation, it is an objective measure we can each use as a benchmark. I just take a 6 or 8 ounce sample, spread it on a cookie sheet, and cook it at 300 for an hour or so. Then just compare the pre and post weights and do the math.

    As a quick everyday way of testing mine as I am mulling, gripping a handful the first time should result in almost no adhesion of sand to my skin. After gripping maybe 5 successive handfuls in rapid succession, then there is maybe 50% coverage of my hand. I have also, finally, learned to judge it pretty well visually. But, for me, the grip test is more reliable.

    Denis
     
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  11. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    Yeah, my sand wasn't too wet it was a stupid steel ingot mold that had some moisture in it that went boom. My sand was in perfect condition because if it hadn't been my cast would not have turned out. But thank you for that information I was not aware of those tests. I may be putting them to use in the future.

    Patrick
     
  12. Melterskelter

    Melterskelter Gold Banner Member

    I guess I should have guessed the ingot mold was steel. I just use a green sand open mold I form with a wood pattern that makes four pigs.

    I am not convinced that my grip method of moisture assessment is one that will work for everyone. But the cooking method should be pretty reproducible and is based on a number of good sources where the prefered moisture content does cluster around 4%.

    Denis
     
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  13. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    Alright! I just published a video of making the mold for that Christmas decoration. It basically shows the process that I use to make a mold with my Osborn. There is also some
    slo-mo of the explosion. Enjoy!

    Patrick
     
  14. Al2O3

    Al2O3 Administrator Staff Member Banner Member

    Nice project Patrick and congrats on the award. That was a pretty good steam explosion pop. You're right about pre-heating the ingot molds. As someone who also lives in a cold climate, I can tell you that we're more susceptible to such because water will condense or frost on the cold metal surfaces. The other caution would be the snow and ice in your pouring area. If you happen to have a spill, that could create some real fire works. Besides protecting yourself, if there is wood structure, tar shingled roof, hay, or any other fire load near by, just be mindful of the fire hazard from raining brass too.

    Best,
    Kelly
     
  15. Tobho Mott

    Tobho Mott Gold Banner Member

    You can see the brass raining back down on you in the slow-mo footage, wow! Castings look good. Great to see the machine in action too.

    A longer pouring shank might let you get your face farther from ground zero, but the hood seems like a good addition too. I have a face shield with a hardhat on it but I don't use that one because the lens is scuffed up... Time to figure out what type it takes and order a new one! Think I'll keep using sand molds for ingots though; no need to preheat them, so one less thing to forget in the heat of the moment.

    Jeff
     
  16. Patrick-C

    Patrick-C Silver

    Well, I think this will take care of my PPE problem. No more burns!!:):cool:

    Patrick
     
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